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Religion in Development: Rewriting the Secular Script

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Deneulin, Severine is the author of 'Religion in Development: Rewriting the Secular Script', published 2009 under ISBN 9781848130012 and ISBN 1848130015.
PUBLICATION DATE:
2009
FILE SIZE:
6,22
ISBN:
9781848130012
LANGUAGE:
ENGLISH
AUTHOR:
Deneulin, Severine, Bano
FORMAT:
PDF EPUB FB2
PRICE:
FREE

Religion in Development: Rewriting the Secular Script PDF

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...nt script regarding its treatment of religion, a script which has so far been heavily inscribed in the secular tradition ... Religion in Development: Rewriting the Secular Script by ... ... . It puts forward an understanding of religions as traditions: that religions rest on central thesis and teachings which never cease to be re-interpreted in the light of the social, political and ... issue on religion and development in 2003, and in 2012, Development in Practice devoted two issues to this theme. A number of important books on the subject have also been published, such as Development and Religion: Theology and Pr ... Religion in Development: Rewriting the Secular Script ... ... . A number of important books on the subject have also been published, such as Development and Religion: Theology and Practice (Clarke 2011), Religion in Development: Rewriting the Secular Script (Deneulin and Bano While the early phases of the contemporary development project in the post-World War II era overlooked the ways in which development processes affected men and women differently, for decades now, it has been common to apply a gender analysis to development policy and practice. This recognises the different needs and interests of men and women relative to their position in local and global ... A pervasive secular-religious dichotomy is implicit within this conceptualisation, constructing development as located within the secular domain, set apart from religion. Drawing upon critical scholars of religion, this chapter argues that development studies has perpetuated a 'myth of religious NGOs'. This myth arbitrarily assigns to a diverse set of development actors the status of ......